Open Enrollment | Subscribe to NonProfit PRO HERE
Connect
Follow us on
Advertisement
 

Keep 'Em Around in 2013

You'll get lots of new donors this month; treat them well and they'll stick around.

December 2012 By Pamela Barden
Get the Flash Player to see this rotator.
 

It's that time of year — the time when you get donations from people you have never heard from before. Unfortunately, many of them won't be around in 2013. Attrition is a fact of life at nonprofits, but what you do now can increase the number of first-time donors who remain loyal in the new year.

Check your receipts

Make sure your receipt is valid for tax purposes. Sure, donors don't need receipts for smaller gifts, but many want them and feel they should have them before filing taxes. You can reduce a lot of angst by sending receipts that acknowledge their gifts and meet the IRS's criteria. Be sure to review IRS Publication 1771, "Charitable Contributions: Substantiation and Disclosure Requirements."

What about sending a summary receipt for the year after you close your books on 2012? A good idea that might even net money if you enclose a warm letter of appreciation and a return envelope.

Provide specificity

Tell your donor on the receipt that you used her gift for the project she requested. New donors especially need assurance that you listened and honored their wishes. Having a receipt that includes the gift designation builds confidence in your integrity as an organization.

In addition to having the "gift designation" shown on the receipt, another option is to have a basic receipt letter with one paragraph that is variable depending on the designation. Talk specifically in that paragraph about how the donor's gift will help advance your mission in 2013 through the project he helped fund.

Plan a welcome series

Research shows that you have a 90-day window to get a second gift from a new donor. How you treat donors for those three months is essential. Your goal is to strike a balance. You don't want to overwhelm them with contacts, but you also don't want them to feel ignored.

Once the receipt is mailed, send a welcome mailing. Don't simply put your latest brochure in a No. 10 envelope and expect that to say, "Welcome!" Make sure you include information about your successes, a story (or two) that shows results, and a warm message of welcome. Provide a phone number a new donor can call if she has questions.

 

SPONSORED CONTENT

MORE ON CAMPAIGNS / FUNDING SOURCES >>

FROM THE BOOKSTORE

Written by Millennials about Millennials, Cause for Change: Examines how Millennials communicate, volunteer, take action, influence their peers, and choose to give their time and moneyExplains how Millennials view their role in the workplace, and how their approach is re-shaping nonprofit culture from within Cause for Change: The Why and How of Nonprofit Millennial Engagement

Written by Millennials about Millennials, Cause for Change:
Examines how Millennials communicate, volunteer, take action, influence their peers, and choose to give their time and moneyExplains how Millennials view their role in the workplace, and how their approach is re-shaping nonprofit culture from within...

ORDER NOW

Reading The Ultimate  Insider’s Guide to Winning Foundation Grants is like peeking at someone’s  secret diary or personal email.  You feel  guilty.  This is privileged information.
Only in this case Martin Teitel WANTS to reveal everything  to you. A
 long-time foundation CEO, he’s fed up with the smoke and mirrors of  
grant seeking. Ultimate Insider's Guide to Winning Foundation Grants

Reading The Ultimate Insider’s Guide to Winning Foundation Grants is like peeking at someone’s secret diary or personal email. You feel guilty. This is privileged information. Only in this case Martin Teitel WANTS to reveal everything to you. A long-time foundation CEO, he’s fed up with the smoke and mirrors of...

ORDER NOW

 

COMMENTS

Click here to leave a comment...
Comment *
Most Recent Comments: