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Editor-in-chief

Outrageous Hope

By Margaret Battistelli

About Margaret

Margaret's life in six words: Bountiful blessings, glorious chaos ... glitter included. 

Margaret has been with FundRaising Success since its inception in 2003. Before joining the magazine as its founding editor, she was an editor and writer for America Online; published PhillyFeast, a monthly magazine about food in and around Philadelphia; and held chief editor positions at a variety of newspapers and magazines in the Philadelphia area. She is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia. Contact her at mbattistelli@napco.com.

 

Old Dog Fundraising

Pamela Barden
Your Plan for Summer Fun(draising)
May 28, 2015

Summer is a great time to roll up your sleeves and dig into the work of fundraising that will make...



It's Your Turn

Larry C Johnson
Getting It—or Not
May 28, 2015

When you have a cause that you're passionate about, successfully engaging another to support that effort requires that you understand...



Bedrocks & Beacons

Jeff Jowdy
Measuring Is Essential
May 27, 2015

We have to be out there—identifying, cultivating, engaging and asking prospective donors. The best way to ensure that this is...



Connections

Richard Perry
Why Are We Afraid to Fire People?
May 25, 2015

The primary reason a person does not perform in their job is that the job does not match the person's...



Peeling the Onion

Katrina VanHuss
The Walking Dead Sabotage Nonprofits
May 22, 2015

Recently I've written about my personal epiphany regarding the expense-is-all-that-matters filter through which we/I have looked at nonprofits' effectiveness. The...



Pay It Forward

F. Duke Haddad
The Importance of Marketing Yourself
May 22, 2015

Don't ever forget to market yourself. You are your most important product and key to your ultimate institutional success. No...



Ruthlessly Practical Fundraising

Gail Perry
6 Ways to Get The Most Out of a Major Donor Visit
May 20, 2015

You finally have the appointment with your major donor. Don't strike out when you finally get in the door. Here...



Navigating Off the Napkin

Angie Moore
Are You Going to Fall Out of Searches Now?
May 19, 2015

Big changes have happened at Google, and whether your website is mobile or not is going to affect how they...



ProSpeak

Who's Up Next?
Yes You Can: Ground Rules for Nonprofit Lobbying and Advocacy
May 5, 2015

Given the many issues facing nonprofits today, and the people they serve, it is more important than ever to get...



Digging Deeper

Matt Hugg
Are You in Their Head?
Apr 28, 2015

How well do you know the people you serve? How well do you know the folks you solicit for gifts?...



Outside Counsel

Willis Turner
How to Write a Fundraising Drip Campaign
Apr 27, 2015

According to the Rule of 7, it takes an average of seven exposures to a message before it sinks in...



Get What You Give

Joe Boland
NonProfit PRO Leadership Conference: Navigating a Difficult Nonprofit Environment
Mar 24, 2015

At the inaugural NonProfit PRO Leadership Conference May 5 in Washington, D.C., Paul Bellantone, president and CEO of Promotional Products...



Hump Day Hullabaloo

Jo Sullivan
Hump Day Hullaballoo: Sometimes It's Hell in the Hallway
May 22, 2013

This week, as I transition into my new position as interim executive director at Save the Chimps, we're talking about...



Donor Trippin'

Nick Allen
Is There an App for Us?
Jul 1, 2014

Got an idea for an app that could connect a charity or nonprofit with its supporters and beneficiaries in an...



Raising the Possibilities

Thaddeus B. Kubis
Recurring Themes: The Case for Integrated Marketing Communications, Part 2
Dec 27, 2013

Recent discussions focus on a myriad of topics, but in the past two months, the recurring targeted topics seem to...



Wow. Just Wow

 

I'm not sure what was more surprising: the fact that the popular satire site The Onion posted a tweet during Sunday's Oscars that called 9-year-old starlet Quvenzhané Wallis a word deemed so offensive that even the most daring sites are replacing the last three letters with symbols (after the initial c) — or that the usually brilliant but nonetheless tactless Onion issued a sincere apology. No joking, no backpedaling, no excuses, no blame games, no sarcasm. Just a sincere, flat-out apology.

The tweet was immediately taken down, and according to Onion CEO Steve Hannah's public apology, those responsible faced disciplinary action.

The first was surprising in a "whoa, can you believe they just did that?" kind of way; the second in a refreshing way.

Stuff happens. An unfortunate typo gets through. Or as in this case, an overzealous keeper of your organization's Twitter or Facebook or whatever account lets something get by that maybe shouldn't have. (Yes, it was in keeping with The Onion's usual biting satire, but even many Onion devotees found it to be a bit much, given the girl's age.)

The difference is in what you do once the damage is done. I have to hand it to The Onion. Handling this incident the way it did speaks volumes. The tweet was removed but it can't be undone, so the best thing to do is exactly what The Onion did.

Do you think nonprofit organizations have anything to learn from this whole mess?

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